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BELIZE'S SYMBOLS OF NATIONHOOD

THE BELIZE FLAG


ITS MEANING




Officially adopted on September 21, 1981, the flag has as its main colors red, white and blue, with green for the represented vegetation.

Blue is the party color of the PUP (People's United Party) - the ruling party when Belize became indpendent.  Red, represented by stripes, is the color of the UDP (United Democratic Party), the other major party at the time of independence.


The Belize Coat of Arms (see below) is at the center of the flag.


BELIZE'S COAT OF ARMS


ITS MEANING




The Coat of Arms is based on the mahogany industry, the mainstay of the country’s economy in the 18th and 19th centuries.


The shield at the center of the Coat of Arms shows a ship at sea in full sail together with tools of the timber industry: at right, a paddle and a squaring axe, and at left, a saw and a beating axe.

Two woodcutters support the shield: one on the right holding a beating axe, and one on the left holding a paddle.


Above the shield rises a mahogany tree. Below the shield is a scroll with the national motto: “Sub Umbra Florero” – Latin for "Under the shade I flourish."


The Coat of Arms is encircled by a wreath of 50 leaves, recalling 1950, the year the PUP came into power.



BELIZE'S NATIONAL ANTHEM



NOTES


Land of the Free


O. Land of the Free by the Carib Sea,

Our manhood we pledge to thy liberty!

No tyrants here linger, despots must flee

This tranquil haven of democracy

The blood of our sires which hallows the sod,

Brought freedom from slavery oppression's rod,

By the might of truth and the grace of God,

No longer shall we be hewers of wood.


Arise! ye sons of the Baymen's clan,

Put on your armour, clear the land!

Drive back the tyrants, let despots flee -

Land of the Free by the Carib Sea!


Nature has blessed thee with wealth untold,

O'er mountains and valleys where prairies roll;

Our fathers, the Baymen, valiant and bold

Drove back the invader; this heritage hold

From proud Rio Hondo to old Sarstoon,

Through coral isle, over blue lagoon;

Keep watch with the angels, the stars and moon;

For freedom comes tomorrow's noon.


 







Words by Samuel Alfred Haynes (1898-1971)



Music by Selwyn Walford Young (1899-1977)


 (See creole version)